Storm Water Management

History

On November 16, 1990, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ruled that municipalities and industry share the responsibility to improve the water quality of the “Waters of the United States”. In accordance with this rule, the EPA created regulations for NPDES Storm Water Permits for municipalities and permits associated with industrial activity. These regulations are aimed at reducing the amount of non-point source pollution that is currently the leading cause of water pollution.

The Water Quality Act involves a two-phased municipal permitting program that requires municipalities of certain populations to establish discharge controls to the Maximum Extent Practicable (MEP), to effectively prohibit non-storm water discharges to the municipal separate storm sewer systems, and where necessary, to contain applicable water quality based controls. Compliance with the maximum extent practicable requirement can be attained by developing a storm water management plan that addresses the six minimum control measures described in the storm water regulations and detailed in fact sheets developed and provided by EPA.

On December 27, 2013, The City of Chickasaw, with a population of 6,010 according to the 2013 census, was granted coverage under the MS4 Phase II General Permit ALR040045, replacing the Phase I General Permit ALS00002. To fulfill the requirements of this permit, The City of Chickasaw has developed a Storm Water Management Program (SWMP).

Objective of the Storm Water Management Program (SWMP)

The purpose of the Storm Water Management Program is to reduce the discharge of pollutants to the maximum extent practicable, protect water quality, and satisfy the appropriate water quality requirements of the Clean Water Act. The SWMP consists of a comprehensive list of Best Management Practices (BMP’s) that addresses the following six minimum control measures as outlined in Section III.B of the Phase II NPDES Permit:

1. Public Education and Outreach on Storm Water Impacts
2. Public Involvement/Participation
3. Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination
4. Construction Site Storm Water Runoff Control
5. Post-Construction Storm Water Management in New Development and Redevelopment
6. Pollution Prevention/Good Housekeeping for Municipal Operations

The City of Chickasaw is committed to fulfilling the requirements of the Phase II NPDES Permit by implementing the practices outlined in the SWMP.  The responsibilities of the SWMP are shared among City employees and community volunteers who recognize the importance of protecting our streams and waterways from degradation.

Stormwater goes directly from the storm drainage system into our local creeks and rivers.

Anything on the sidewalks and streets, such as grass clippings, leaves, pet waste, trash or excess fertilizer, is carried away by stormwater runoff and ends up in storm drains, where it flows into our rivers, lakes and streams.

What can you do?

      • Bag pet wastes.
      • Avoid over-watering.
      • Apply fertilizer sparingly and at the right time.
      • Carefully read and follow package directions for pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers.
      • Dispose of lawn and garden chemicals properly.
      • Never dump motor oil, petroleum products, antifreeze, transmission fluids, engine cleaners or battery acid down storm drains or on the ground.
      • If a spill occurs, do not rinse the area with water. Instead use kitty litter, sawdust, or wood chips to soak up the fluid then put it into the trash.

Resources and Tips

Storm Water Reports

Chickasaw Storm Water Management Plans 

2014 Storm Water Management Plan